Música

 

Traduções das músicas de Enya que não estão em inglês

Shepherd Moons
Cover

All lyrics are by Roma Ryan unless otherwise noted.

Comments on the inspiration and meaning of these songs can be found in Roma Ryan's foreword to the Shepherd Moons sheet music book. These comments are available in The Enya Papers #22, available on the Enya Unofficial Home Page, in the transcripts area.

Some of the mystical incantations, which begin or end songs, may not be included in these translations.

Memory of Threes
Cover
All lyrics are by Roma Ryan unless otherwise noted.

The Celts

Cover

All lyrics are by Roma Ryan unless otherwise noted.

The mystical incantations throughout these songs are not translated since they have no English equivalent.

Watermark
Cover

All lyrics are by Roma Ryan unless otherwise noted.

The mystical incantations throughout these songs are not translated since they have no English equivalent.


How Can I Keep From Singing?

Traditional Shaker Hymn

My life goes on in endless song
above earth's lamentations,
I hear the real, though far-off hymn
that hails a new creation.

Through all the tumult and the strife
I hear it's music ringing,
it sounds an echo in my soul.
How can I keep from singing?

While though the tempest loudly roars, [1]
I hear the truth it liveth.
And though the darkness 'round me close,
songs in the night it giveth.

No storm can shake my inmost calm
While to that rock I'm clinging.
Since love is lord of heaven and earth,
how can I keep from singing?

When tyrants tremble in their fear
and hear their death knell ringing,
when friends rejoice both far and near
how can I keep from singing?

In prison cell and dungeon vile
our thoughts to them are winging,
when friends by shame are undefiled
how can I keep from singing?

  1. The lyrics printed in Shepherd Moons are missing the second verse (the third and fourth blocks of text).

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Ebudæ

Irish Gaelic

Amharc, mná ag obair lá 's mall san oích',
Ceolann siad ar laetha geal, a bhí,
Bealach fada anonn 's anall a chóich'.
Look, women working by day and late at night,
They sing of bright days that were,
A long way back and forth forever.
  1. The Hebrides, or Western Isles, of Scotland were known as the Hebudæ or the Ebudæ in ancient times. The name is of Latin origin, appearing on ancient maps of Roman Britain.
  2. This song is loosely based on the traditional "waulking songs" sung by women and used when fulling cloth. Waulking songs are unique to the Outer Hebrides.

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Book of Days

Irish Gaelic

Ó lá go lá, mo thuras,
An bealach fada romham.
Ó oíche go hoíche, mo thuras,
na scéalta nach mbeidh a choích'.
From day to day, my journey,
The long pilgrimage before me.
From night to night, my journey,
The stories that will never be again.

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Book of Days - Far and Away

English & Irish Gaelic

One day, one night, one moment
My dreams could be tomorrow
One step, one fall, one falter
East or west
Over earth or by ocean
One way to be my journey
This way could be my Book of Days

Ó lá go lá, mo thuras,
An bealach fada romham.
Ó oíche go hoíche, mo thuras,
na scéalta nach mbeidh a choích'.

No day, no night, no moment
Can hold me back from trying
I'll flag, I'll fall, I'll falter
I'll find my day may be Far and Away
Far and Away

Interlude

One day, one night, one moment
With a dream to be leaving
One step, one fall, one falter
And a new earth across a wide ocean
This way became my journey
This day ends together, Far and Away

This day ends together, Far and Away
Far and Away

  1. This version was produced for and released with the soundtrack for the movie Far and Away, starring Tom Cruise & Nicole Kidman.
  2. This version of the song has been released in place of the original version in recent pressings of Shepherd Moons.

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Afer Ventus

Latin

Afer Ventus [1]
African Wind
Mare Nubium. Umbriel.
Mare Imbrium. Ariel.
Et itur ad astra.
Et itur ad astra.
Mare Undarum. Io. Vela.

Mirabile dictu. Mirabilia.
Mirabile visu. Mirabilia.
Et itur ad astra.
Et itur ad astra.
Sempervirent. Rosetum.

Afer Ventus. Zephyrus.
Volturnus. Africus.
Et itur ad astra.
Et itur ad astra.
Etesiarum. Eurus.

Running verse:
Suus cuique mos. Suum cuique.
Meus mihi, suus cuique carus.
Mememto, terrigena.
Mememto, vita brevis.
Meus mihi, suus cuique carus.

Sea of Clouds. Umbriel. [2] [3]
Sea of Showers. Ariel.
And we go to the stars. [4] [5]
And we go to the stars.
Sea of Waves. Io. Vela. [6] [7]

Wonderful to relate. Marvels. [8]
Wonderful to see. Wonders.
And we go to the stars.
And we go to the stars.
Evergreen. A rose garden. [9]

African Wind. Zephyrus. [10]
Volturnus. Africus. [11] [12]
And we go to the stars.
And we go to the stars.
Etesiarum. Eurus. [13] [14]


Each has its own habits. Each its own. [15]
Mine to me, its own to each is dear. [16]
Remember, life is earth-born. [17]
Remember, it is brief.
Mine to me, its own to each is dear.

  1. Ventus may refer to either a wind (particularly a named wind, personified as a deity) or a wind as affecting a voyage favorably or otherwise by direction.
  2. Umbriel and Ariel are two moons of Uranus. In addition, Umbriel is a character in Alexander Pope's The Rape of the Lock and Ariel is the name of "an airy Spirit" in Shakespeare's The Tempest.
  3. All of the different "maria" (Mare Imbrium, Mare Undarum, and Mare Undarum) are geographical features of the moon (lunar seas).
  4. It is difficult to put into English the "impersonal" meaning of "itur", which is actually the third person singular of the passive indicative present tense of the verb "ire", meaning "to go". Since "to go" cannot possibly be passive ("I am gone?") the passive mode is understood to sound as done by everybody and nobody in particular at the same time, really like something that gets done but without specifying by whom.
  5. There is a famous phrase in Virgil's Aeneid which reads "sic itur ad astra" which has a literal meaning "thus you shall go to the stars", but the poetic, metaphorical meaning is "thus is immortality gained". So substituting "et" ("and", "also") for "sic" ("thus", "therefore") the translation might read along the lines of "and you shall go to the stars" or perhaps "and you shall live forever".
  6. Vela ("a boat's sail") refers to the constellation Vela, representing the sails of the ship Argo.
  7. Io: a maiden loved by Zeus, who changed her into a heifer so that she might escape the jealous rage of Hera [Lat. < Gk. Io], also one of the four inner Galilean moons of Jupiter.
  8. Mirabilia: neuter pl. marvelous things.
  9. Sempervirent: always green [Lat. semper, always + virere, to be green.]
  10. Zephyrus: a god personifying the gentle west wind [Lat. < Gk. Zephuros.]
  11. Volturnus: a god personifying the southeast wind.
  12. Africus: a god personifying the southwest storm-rain wind.
  13. Etesiarum: pl. of Etesian. recurring annually. It is used of prevailing northerly summer winds of the Mediterranean [Lat. etesius < Gk. etesius < etos, year.]
  14. Eurus: a god personifying the east or southeast wind [Lat. < Gk. Euros.]
  15. Latin likes to take the adjective that corresponds to a set and postpone it to go with the last member of that set (English puts it with the first member). So a more idiomatic rendering in English might be: "To each, its/his/her own custom is dear; to each, its/his/her own."
  16. And likewise: "To me, my own is dear. To each its/his/her own."
  17. terrigena: earth-born creature [Lat. terra, earth + genus, race or kind.]

Due to the nearly exhaustive discussion included above, submissions for additional comments on "Afer Ventus" will probably not be accepted. The reader is encouraged to do his or her own research into Roman and Greek mythology if more information is desired.

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Smaointe...

Irish Gaelic

Smaointe...
A Thought...
(D'Aodh Agus Do Mháire Uí Dhúgain)


Éist le mo chroí,
Go brónach a choích'
Tá mé caillte gan tú
's do bhean chéile.
An grá mór i do shaoil
Treoraí sé mé.
Bígí liomsa i gcónaí
Lá 's oích'.

Curfá:
Ag caoineadh ar an uaigneas mór
Na deora, go brónach
'Na gcodladh ins an uaigh ghlas chiúin
Faoi shuaimhneas, go domhain.

Aoibhneas a bhí
Ach d'imigh sin
Sé lean tú
Do fhear chéile.
An grá mór i do shaoil
Treoraí sé mé.
Bígí liomsa i gcónaí
Lá 's oích'.

Curfá

Smaointe, ar an lá
'Raibh sibh ar mo thaobh
Ag inse scéil
Ar an dóigh a bhí
Is cuimhin liom an lá
Gan ghá 's gan ghruaim
Bígí liomsa i gcónaí
Lá 's oích'.

(To my maternal grandparents,
literally: "For Hugh and Mary Duggan")

Listen to my heart,
Forever sad
I'm lost without you
and your wife.
The great love in your lives [1]
Will guide me.
Be (plural) with me always
Day and night.

Chorus:
Weeping due to the great loneliness
The tears, sorrowfully
Asleep in the quiet green grave
In a deep peace.

There was blissfulness
But that is gone
You followed
Your husband.
The great love in your lives
Will guide me.
Be (plural) with me always
Day and night.

Chorus

A thought, on the day
You were (both) at my side
Telling tales
Of how things were.
I remember the day
Carefree and happy [2]
Be (plural) with me always
Day and night.

  1. The meaning of this phrase in this context is "the love that was shown by the two of you".
  2. Literally "without need and without gloom".


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Credits

How Can I Keep From Singing?
Missing verse transcripted by Jagg Groeg. Remainder transcripted by Daniel Quinlan.
Ebudæ
Translation by Dr. N. Stenson (posted by David Saranen). Notes by Gesine Dagmar Stanienda and Daniel Quinlan.
Book of Days
Translation by Dave Allum.
Book of Days - Far and Away
Posted by Martin Falatic and others. Corrections from several different people.
Afer Ventus
Translation and notes by Larry M. Jordan, Magnus Olsson, Mauro Cicognini, Custodio, Giles Armstrong, Konrad Schroder, Aidan Hollinshead, Edith Hamilton (posted by Nate Scherer), Graham at the University of Delaware, and unknown persons. Notes later completely reworked by Daniel Quinlan.
Smaointe...
Text taken from translations by Steve Hopper and Dr. N. Stenson (posted by David Saranen). Notes by Aidan Hollinshead. Numerous corrections from Willie Arbuckle.

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Pax Deorum

Latin & Irish Gaelic

Pax Deorum

Peace of the Gods [1]
..domineoveniteosacramentum(discesm)eodeo
domineoveniteosacramentum(discesm)eodeo
domineoveniteosacramentum(discesm)eodeo..
athairarneamhdialinn..athairarneamhdialiom


Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum.
Omnem crede diem tibi diluxisse supremum.
[2] [3]


Father in Heaven, God bless us..
Father in Heaven, God bless me [4]

Believe that each day which breaks is your last. [5]
Believe that each day which breaks is your last.
  1. The object of Roman religion was to secure the cooperation, benevolence, and "peace" of the gods, hence "pax deorum".
  2. This Latin may be divided to obtain "domine o venite o sacramentum (disces m)eo deo", which is difficult to translate and is questionable grammar. It may be intended to mean both "lord o come o sacrament by/from that god" and "lord o come o sacrament (you) learn of/from my god". The lyric doesn't seem to be duplicable in English.
  3. The word "sacramentum" is a Latin word used to describe an oath. Later, it came to refer to a formal Christian rite, especially one considered to have been instituted by Jesus as a means of grace (often communion).
  4. This Irish Gaelic is the same as the first two lines of "Athair ar Neamh".
  5. This Latin is an exact quote from Horace's Epistles, Book I, Epistle IV, line 13. The whole sentence of which this is part (lines 12-14) reads:

    Inter spem curamque, timores inter et iras
    omnen crede diem tibi diluxisse supremem:
    grata superveniet quae non sperabitur hora.

    This means:

    Amid the hope and worry, the fear and anger
    believe that each day which breaks is your last:
    the unhoped for hour will be a welcome surprise.

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Athair ar Neamh

Irish Gaelic

Athair ar Neamh
Father in Heaven
Athair ar Neamh, Dia linn
Athair ar Neamh, Dia liom
M'anam, mo chroí, mo ghlóir,
moladh duit, a Dhia.

Fada an lá, go sámh
Fada an oích', gan ghruaim
Aoibhneas, áthas, grá,
moladh duit, a Dhia.

Móraim thú ó lá go lá.
Móraim thú ó oích' go hóich'.

Athair ar Neamh, Dia linn
Athair ar Neamh, Dia liom
An ghealach, an ghrian, an ghaoth,
moladh duit, a Dhia.

Father in Heaven, God bless us [1]
Father in Heaven, God bless me
My soul, my heart, my glory,
praise to you, God.

Long is the peaceful day
Long is the night without gloom
Delight, joy, love,
praise to you, God.

I glorify you day after day.
I glorify you night after night.

Father in Heaven, God bless us
Father in Heaven, God bless me
The moon, the sun, the wind,
praise to you, God.

  1. A literal translation of "Dia linn" is "God be with us".

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La Soñadora

Spanish

La Soñadora
The Dreamer
Yo; el otoño
Yo; el vespero
He sido un eco

Seré una ola
Seré la luna
He sido todo, soy yo

Yo; el verano
Yo; el ébano
Soy la soñadora

I; the autumn
I; the evening star [1]
I have been an echo

I shall be a wave
I shall be the moon
I have been everything, I am myself

I; the summer
I; the ebony
I am the dreamer

  1. vespero: the planet Venus as a star of the late afternoon or early evening [Lat. vesperus, evening, evening star.]



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Credits

Pax Deorum
Translation by Stefano Toria, William F. Hoffman, John K. Wardle, and Daniel Quinlan.
Athair ar Neamh
Translation merged from independent translations by Allan Riepsaame and Dennis Ryan.
La Soñadora
Translation by Stefano Toria. Corrections from Luis R. Emiro and Daniel Quinlan.


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The Celts

Irish Gaelic

Hi-ri, Hi-ro, Hi-ri.
Hoireann is O, ha hi, ra ha, ra ho ra.
Hoireann is O, ha hi, ra ha, ra ha ra.
Hi-ri, Hi-ra, Hi-ri.

Saol na saol,
Tús go deireadh.
Tá muid beo
Go deo.

Saol na saol,
Tús go deireadh.
Tá muid beo
Go deo.

Hi-ri, Hi-ra, Hi-ri,
Hoireann is O, ho hi, ra ha, ra ha ra.

Repeat






Life of lives, [1]
Beginning to the end.
We are alive
Forever.

Life of lives,
Beginning to the end.
We are alive
Forever.

  1. Literally "life of lives", this really means "forever" or "world without end". It is also the conclusion of the Irish Gaelic version of the "Our Father" prayer.

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Aldebaran

Irish Gaelic

Codladh fada,
Codladh domhain.
Éirigh! Amharc síos
Aldebaran.

Siúil liom tríd an réalta dearg.
Deireadh, deireadh an turas.
Réaltóg, réaltóg dearg.

Long sleep,
Deep sleep.
Rise! Look down
Aldebaran.

Walk with me through the red star.
The end, end of the journey.
Star, red star.

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I Want Tomorrow

Dawn breaks; there is blue in the sky,
your face before me though I don't know why.
Thoughts disappearing like tears from the Moon.

Waiting here, as I sit by the stone,
they came before me, those men from the Sun.
Signs from the heavens say I am the one.

Chorus:
Now you're here, I can see your light,
this light that I must follow.
You, you may take my life away, so far away.
Now I know I must leave your spell
-- I want tomorrow.

Chorus

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March of the Celts

Irish Gaelic

Hi-ra-U-O
Beo go deo.

Ole ole ole,
ole ole ole ole ole ole ole,
ole ole ole,
ole ole ole.

Hi-ri-U-O
Marbh go deo.


Alive forever.

Chant 13 times





Dead forever.

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Deireadh an Tuath

Irish Gaelic

Deireadh an Tuath
End of the Tribe
'Sí an ghealach,
mall san oíche.
'Sí an ghrian.
Fán liom go deo.

Hoireann is O Hi O Ho ra Ha.

'Sí na Samhna,
tús na Bliain Úr.
'Sí an crann marbh.
Deireadh an tua.

Hoireann is O Ho O Ho ro Ho.
Hoireann is O Ho O Ho ro Ho.

It is the Moon,
late in the night.
It is the Sun.
Stay with me forever.



It is Halloween, [1]
beginning of the New Year.
It's the dead tree.
End of the tribe.
  1. "Samhna" is the genitive singular case of "Samhain", which is the name given to the first day of November. This day was a very large feast in pagan, especially Celtic, tradition. It was one of the most important festivals of the year. (The month of November is "Mí na Samhna" in Irish and "Oíche Shamhna" is the Irish for Halloween.)

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Triad: St. Patrick

Traditional, Irish Gaelic

Tabhair dom ghrása,
Fíormhac Dé.
Tabhair dom do neartsa,
An ghrian gheal glé.

Repeat

Give me your love,
true Son of God.
Give me strength,
the clear bright sun.

Repeat

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Dan y Dw+r

Welsh

Dan y Dw+r
Beneath the Waters
Dan y dw+r, tawelwch sydd.
Dan y dw+r, galwaf i.
Nid yw'r sw+n gyda fi.

Dan y dw+r, tawelwch am byth.
Dan y dw+r, galwaf i.
Nid yw'r sw+n ddim fwy gyda fi.

Beneath the waters, there is silence.
Beneath the waters, I call you.
There is no company with me.

Beneath the waters, silent forever.
Beneath the waters, I call you.
The sound is no longer with me.

  1. "+" is a Welsh internet convention showing that the previous character is accented by a circumflex, "^". For example, "a+" is the convention for "â".


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Credits

Some text from a Japanese release of The Celts was provided by Jagg Groeg.

Additional information from another Japanese release of The Celts (WEA Music WMC5-561) was provided by Daniel Quinlan.

Translations for most songs were provided by Fidelma McGinn.

The Celts
Corrections from Daniel Quinlan. Corrections and notes from Willie Arbuckle.
Deireadh an Tuath
Corrections and notes from Daniel Quinlan and Willie Arbuckle.
Dan y Dw+r
The translation was provided by Elizabeth Benning (obtained by Phillip M. Darlington).


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Cursum Perficio

Latin

Cursum perficio.
Verbum sapienti:
quo plus habent,
eo plus cupiunt.
Post nubila, Phoebus
Iternum
I finish the course.
A word to the wise: [1]
the more [people] have,
the more they want.
After the clouds, Phoebus [2] [3]
[4]
  1. To be precise, "sapienti" is the dative singular of the adjective "sapiens" (knowing or wise). Therefore, without a noun, "sapienti" can only refer to a wise man or woman, while "to the wise" refers to more than one, which the Latin does not state.
  2. Phoebus: the Roman god of sunlight, prophecy, music, and poetry (same as the Greek god Apollo) [Lat. < Gk. Phoibos < phoibos, radiant]. When not capitalized, the sun.
  3. This is also a modern Latin proverb meaning "after clouds (comes) the sun" or "after rain comes the sunshine".
  4. In the Watermark notes, this word is spelled "iternum", which is either a nonexistent word or a poetic form. In all probability, it is either a misspelling of "eternum" (eternal), a misspelling of "iterum" (again and again), or a poetic form meaning "journey". Here are the various possibilities played out:
    • "Eternum" is rather clearly enunciated, but it is very rare that an adjective be used as an adverb. In addition, "E" is not a strictly accurate beginning of "Eternum" because it leaves out the preceding "A", which creates a diphthong. It should be "Æternum".
    • Transcribing "iternum" instead of "iterum" is a common error to make, and has occured elsewhere (such as the Codex Vaticanus manuscript of Tacitus's Agricola), involving the lengthening of the tail of "r" to "n" and duplicating it. "Iterum" also fits the tone as well as the tense, that of one tormented by the demands of others again and again.
    • Iternum means "journey". It is related to "iter" (to journey), and the form seems to be in the genitive plural, which actually should be "itinerum", not "iternum" as written. This should be translated as "journey" or perhaps "of the journeys" since the notes state that this song was inspired by an inscription found in the portico of Marilyn Monroe's last home, "My journey ends here".

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Storms in Africa

Irish Gaelic

Cá fhad é ó
Cá fhad é ó

Siúil tríd na stoirmeacha.
Dul tríd na stoirmeacha.

Cá fhad é ó
an tús don stoirm.
Cá fhad é ó
an tús go deireadh.

Tóg do chroí.
Siúil tríd na stoirmeacha.
Tóg do chroísa.
Dul tríd na stoirmeacha.

Turas mór.
Tor tríd na stoirmeacha.

Turas fada.
Amharc tríd na stoirmeacha.

How far is it from
How far is it from

Walking through the storms.
Going through the storms.

How far is it from
the beginning to the storm
How far is it from
the start to the end.

Lift your heart.
Walking through the storms.
Lift your heart!
Going through the storms.

Great journey.
Heavy through the storms.

Long journey.
Look through the storms.

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Storms in Africa

Irish Gaelic, as recorded by Enya [1]

Cá fhad é ó
Cá fhad é ó

Siúil trí na stoirmeacha.
Tar trí na stoirmeacha.

Cá fhad é ó
na néalta dubh'.
Cá fhad é ó
an tús go deireadh.

Tóg do chroí.
Siúil trí na stoirmeacha.
Tóg do chroíse.
Tar trí na stoirmeacha.

Turas fada.
Tar trí na stoirmeacha.

Turas fada.
Amharc trí na stoirmeacha.

How far is it [2]
How far is it

Walk through the storms. [3] [4]
Come through the storms.

How far is it from
the black clouds.
How far is it from [5]
the beginning to an end.

Lift your heart.
Walk through the storms.
Lift your heart!
Come through the storms.

A long journey.
Come through the storms. [6]

A long journey.
Look through the storms.

  1. The lyric Enya actually sings differs somewhat from that found in liner notes and printed music. Notice also that two voices alternate through the lyric until they unite in the final line. Styling of the lines distinguishes them.
  2. "Cá fhad é ó" means "How far is it from" or "How long is it since".
  3. The verbs "siúil", "tar", "tóg", and "amharc" are imperative singular forms. There is symmetry in their use.
  4. If Enya sings "tríd", rather than "trí", her "d" is indistinct. "Tríd na" is a variant of the standard "trí na".
  5. "Ó" (from) and the definite article are normally combined into a single word: ó + an = ón.
  6. The liner notes do place the word "tar" here.

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The Longships

Irish Gaelic

Hi-ri-u
Ho-ro-ho
Ho-ri-u
Him-o-ro-ho

Hoireann is oro
Tá muid beo
Him oro ho
Go deor na ndeor
(Incantations not translated)





We are alive

Forever and ever

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Na Laetha Gael M'óige

Irish Gaelic

Na Laetha Geal M'óige
The Bright Days of My Youth
(In ómós do mo mháthair agus do m'athair)

Ag amharc trí m'óige,
Is mé 'bhí sámh,
Gan eolas marbh
Bhí mé óg gan am,

Anois, táim buartha,
's fad ar shiúil an lá.
Ochón 's ochón ó.

Na laetha geal m'óige
Bhí siad lán de dhóchas
An bealach mór a bhí romham anonn
Bhí sé i ndán domh go mbéinn, slán, slán.

Anois, táim buartha,
's fad ar shiúil an lá.
Ochón 's ochón ó.

Na laetha geal m'óige
Bhí siad lán de dhóchas
An bealach mór a bhí romham anonn
Bhí sé i ndán domh go mbéinn, slán, slán.

Anois, táim buartha,
's fad' ar shiúil an lá.
Ochón 's ochón ó.

(In honor of my father and mother)

Looking back over my youth,
I was content,
Without knowledge of death
I was young, without time,

Now I'm sorrowful,
The day is long past.
Alas and woe, oh.

The bright days of my youth
They were full of hope
The great journey that was before me then
Was what was destined to be, bye bye.

Now I'm sorrowful,
The day is long past.
Alas and woe, oh.

The bright days of my youth
They were full of hope
The great journey that was before me then
Was what was destined to be, bye bye.

Now I am sorrowful,
The day is long past.
Alas and woe, oh.

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Storms in Africa (Part II)

Though I walk through
warm sands in Africa
winds will grow soon
to storms in Africa.

How far to go
I cannot say.
How many more
will journey this way?

Dark skies fall on
black earth and ivory.
Far from your sun
clouds now close over me.

How far to go
I cannot say.
How many more
will journey this way?

Storms have come!
rains wash the earth away
Dark skies fall down
into another day.
Rains have now come
from storms in Africa
Time will go on
through storms in Africa


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Credits

Cursum Perficio
Translation by Konrad Schroder, notes by Mauro Cicognini, Duncan Jones, Daniel Quinlan, Teresa Negrucci, and Kimmo Savolainen.
Storms in Africa
Translation by Fidelma McGinn. Corrections from Willie Arbuckle.
Storms in Africa
As recorded by Enya: Transcription and translation by Richard Manser.
Storms in Africa (Part II)
Transcription by Jagg Groeg.
The Longships
Translation by Fidelma McGinn. Corrections from Willie Arbuckle.
Na Laetha Geal M'óige
Text taken from translations by Dennis Ryan, Anne-Marie Curtis (posted by Kirsten Starcher), Dennis Foley, and Marion Gunn (posted 2 December 1991 on GAELIC-L mailing list). Corrections from Willie Arbuckle.


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